Startups Profile

Aerobotics: Story, Founders, Investors & Funding Rounds

Aerobotics: Story, Founders, Investors & Funding Rounds

Aerobotics is a company based in South Africa that analyzes data, and uses satellite photography and AI to help farmers find pests and diseases as soon as they show up.

The company creates an aerial imaging system for use in agriculture that makes use of unmanned aerial vehicles (drones) to take images from a more elevated position.

More than seven years ago, Aerobotics began taking photographs of perennial crops, gathering data from over two hundred farmers working on more than a million acres. 

The cloud-based program Aeroview from the company helps farmers protect their tree and vine crops from pests and diseases by giving them information, mapping, and other tools.

Farming, surveying, gaming, and security are just some of the businesses that could use the company’s drones, as well as the DJI flight planner app, data processing tools, and analytical tools.

In addition to designing technical systems, they have a lot of experience making business-level decisions about product direction, project management, pricing, and sales strategy, with a focus on automation in the data processing and analytics fields.

How it Works

The website for Aerobotics uses more than 16 different web technologies. There are many of them, like SSL, JavaScript, Widgets, Content Management systems, Frameworks, and many more.

The company’s software uses satellite and drone imagery along with machine learning algorithms to help with orchard management, problem tree identification, pest and disease management, and yield management. 

As a result, farmers can scan their fields, examine the data they’ve acquired, reduce their expenses, and boost their yields.

Aerobotics’ primary mission is to do research and development on AI systems for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs).

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They do this by making high-quality, innovative software for systems that let planes fly themselves and for automatically evaluating mission data. Most of what Aerobotics company does is in the agricultural field.

Founders

James Paterson

James Paterson is both the founder of Aerobotics and the current Chief Executive Officer of the firm (chief executive officer).

He went to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and got his degree.

He later graduated with a Master of Science (MSc) with honors in Aerospace, Aeronautical, and Astronautical/Space Engineering as well.

He also graduated from The University of Cape Town with a BSc in Mechatronics, Robotics, and Automation Engineering. Bachelor of Science in Engineering in Mechatronics, Robotics, and Automation (BSc)

Benji Meltzer

Benji Meltzer is a South African data scientist, engineer, and entrepreneur who doubles up as the Co-Founder & CTO at Aerobotics Company/.

He went to Imperial College in London and got a Master of Science in Biomedical/Medical Engineering in Neurotechnology.

He also has a Bachelor of Science in Mechatronics Engineering, which he got from the University of Cape Town.

Investors & Funding Rounds

Paper Plane Ventures

Paper Plane Ventures contributed an additional $2 million to Aerobotics’ Series A investment round, increasing the total amount of funding for this round to $4 million. This will be beneficial to the expansion of the organization.

Additionally, the company’s investors gave Aerobotics a total of $43,167,051.00 throughout 8 funding rounds.

Main Competitors

Aerobotics’ main competitors in Africa are Komaza, Senwes, and Wefarm.

Wefarm (Nairobi, Kenya)

Wefarm is a marketplace and social network for small-scale farmers. It helps them connect and get the resources they need, even if not everyone has access to the internet.

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Senwes(South Africa)

Senwes Limited is primarily concerned with assisting people in the cultivation of maize by providing them with money, equipment, and supplies.

Komaza (Coast, Kenya)

Komaza is turning Africa’s small-scale farmers into the future of the continent’s forest industry.

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